Crisis? What Crisis?

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What the papers say...

'This is a masterful work of social history and cultural commentary, told with much wit.' - Roger Lewis, Mail on Sunday

'This vivid, brilliantly researched chronicle ... Turner may be an anorak, but he is an acutely intelligent anorak.' - Francis Wheen, New Statesman

'entertaining and splendidly researched ... an account that displays wit, colour and detail.' - Brian Groom, Financial Times

'Turner's narrative is quite compelling ... This is about as far away from sober, stuffy history as you can get and deserves a wide readership.' - Sue Baker, Publishing News (Book of the Month)

'Concise, cogently argued and leavened with a dry wit.' - Christopher Silvester, Daily Express

'This is an adventurous and enjoyable reassessment of a much-maligned decade.' - Nick Rennison, BBC History Magazine

'Turner combines a fan's sense of populism ... with a keen grasp of the political landscape, which gives his survey of an often overlooked decade its cutting edge.' - Keith Watson, Metro

'the book is sharp and often funny ... eclectic, not to say eccentric.' - Francis Beckett, Guardian

'Fascinating ... an affectionate but unflinching portrait of the era.' - Nicholas Foulkes, Independent on Sunday

'An ambitious, entertaining, alternative history of the 1970s.' - Time Out

'This book is the fruit of an extraordinary amount of research ... a rattling good read.' - Dan Atkinson, Lobster


A summary from The Oldie Review of Books (Autumn 2008):

Crisis? What Crisis is a cultural and political history of tumultuous 1970s Britain which draws on the sitcoms, films, fiction and fashion of the era, as well as Turner's interviews with stars and politicians.

'Turner seems to have spent much of the decade watching television, and his knowledge of old soap operas, sitcoms and TV dramas is deployed to great effect throughout this vivid, brilliantly researched chronicle,' said Francis Wheen in the New Statesman. Many British writers have recently tried to evoke the 1970s but none have done it as precisely as Turner, Wheen explained. 'Turner may be an anorak, but he is an acutely intelligent anorak.'

Turner combines serious history with cultural comment, noting, for example, that Enoch Powell's and Tony Benn's heckling resembled Statler and Waldorf from the Muppet Show. 'This is a masterful work of social history and cultural commentary, told with much wit. It almost makes you feel as if you were there - which I was,' said Roger Lewis in the Mail on Sunday.

Christopher Silvester commented in the Daily Express that Turner was 'adept at locating themes of popular fiction in the wider compass of social anxiety,' and concluded that the book was 'concise, cogently argued and leavened with a dry wit.'


Some of these reviews can be found online:
New Statesman
Financial Times
Guardian
Daily Express
Metro
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